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Happy Thanksgiving Day Japanese Vocabulary Lesson

Happy Thanksgiving Day Japanese Vocabulary Lesson

To those in the US, Happy Thanksgiving!

We decided to make a quick video with Thanksgiving related words in Japanese. This is a special video since my son edited it for us–thank you Makoto!
 
Here are the words in the video, plus a few extra.
Turkey
七面鳥
shichimenchou
[Turkeys aren’t native to Japan. There are a few ideas why turkeys are called 七面鳥 (literally, seven faced bird). One is cooking a turkey is a lot of work and 七面倒 shichimendou means “great trouble” or “difficulty.” Another possible origin is the bird’s face has a variety of colors. Thus it has seven faces. Who knows?]

Pumpkin Pie
パンプキンパイ
panpukin pai
[This is a loan word from English and therefore written in katakana]

Family
家族
kazoku
[家 house + 族 tribe]

Feast
ごちそう
gochisou
[ごちそうする means to treat someone (buy a meal for someone); ごちそうさま is often said after a meal as thanks for the good food.]

Pumpkin
かぼちゃ
kabocha
[From Portuguese “Cambodia abóbora”]
 

 

Now, let’s look at Yumi’s words in the video:

こんにちは、みなさん
konnichi wa, minasan
Hello, everyone.
[You can say みんな or みなさん but みんなさん is not considered correct]

パトロンのみなさん、いつもありがとうございます。
patoron no minasan, itsumo arigatou gozaimasu.
As always, thank you so much, Patreon supporters!
[literally: Patreon’s everyone; always; thank you]
[Since the action (the sense of thankfulness) is on-going, we wouldn’t use the past tense ありがとうございました]

Thanksgiving Dayは日本語で、感謝祭といいます。
Thanksgiving Day wa nihongo de, kanshasai to iimasu.
Thanksgiving Day in Japanese is called “kanshasai.”
[While Japan doesn’t have a “Turkey Day,” there is 勤労感謝の日 kinrō kansha no hi Labor Thanksgiving Day. Today it is a day to commemorate labor, production, and general human well-being, but it was based on an ancient harvest festival known as 新嘗祭 niinamesai.]

今日はその感謝祭に関する日本語を勉強していきましょう。
kyou wa sono kanshasai ni kan suru nihongo wo benkyou shite ikimashou.
Today, let’s use Thanksgiving Day to study Japanese.
[Literally: today; this Thanksgiving Day; concerning; Japanese language; study; to deliberately do (していく shows doing something deliberately. The いく as an auxiliary verb means “to continue” with purpose.)]

それでは、あしたは家族で楽しい感謝祭をお過ごしください。
sore dewa, ashita wa kazoku de tanoshii kanshasai o osugoshi kudasai.
Well, then. Tomorrow, please enjoy spending Thanksgiving Day with your family.

食べ過ぎないでね。
tabesugi naide ne.
Don’t eat too much!
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いっしょにあそぼ! Let’s Play – Japanese Phrases for Children

いっしょにあそぼ! Let’s Play – Japanese Phrases for Children

You may not have known this, but Japanese children, like any other children, like to play games together. Here are a few phrases to get your inner child a-playing in Japanese.

いっしょにあそぼ! Let’s Play – Japanese Phrases for Children

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いっしょにあそぼ!

issho ni asobo!
Let’s play together.

あそぼ should have a う at the end, but it is often dropped in speech, making it a shorter sound.


(なに)してあそぶ?

nani shite asobu?
What do you want to play?

Literally, “what-do-play,” this is a common way for kids to start play.


(なに)かしようよ

nanika shiyou yo
Let’s do something.

When nothing seems to be happening, this is the question to ask the gang. The final よ is for emphasis.


あそびにこう

asobi ni ikou
Let’s go play.

When suggesting to go to the park or pool, this is the phrase to use. The に is used to show the reason (to play) for going (ikou)


かまって!

kamatte
​Pay attention to me!

From 構う kamau meaning “to mind” “to care about” or “to be concerned for”



Games

  • かくれんぼ kakure​nbo -- hide and go seek
  • 鬼ごっこ oni gokko -- tag
  • フルーツバスケット furu-tsu basuketto -- Fruit basket turnover (game) Learn more here.
  • なわとび nawatobi -- jump rope
  • かけっこ kakkeko -- race; sprint
  • じゃんけん janken -- Rock, paper, scissors
  • けん玉 kendama -- kendama; ball and cup. See here.
Playing in Japanese
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Japanese Conversational Interjections 相槌 aizuchi

Japanese Conversational Interjections 相槌 aizuchi

Carrying on a conversation (in any language) isn’t just about getting your ideas across. It is also about showing the other person, the speaker, you are listening. This is especially important in Japanese since it is used all the time.

In English, we might say, “Oh, really?” or “Is that so?” or “Uh huh” to show the speaker we are interested and understanding what he or she is saying. This video lists several important 相槌 aizuchi for showing you are interested or agree with the speaker.

Aizuchi to show Attention

Let’s first look at 相槌  aizuchi that could be considered positive. None of these fully imply the listener even agrees with the speaker. But the listener is interested, engaged, and understanding what the speaker has to say.

Here are the main words (there are many more):

はい yes
hai

While this means “yes,” はい is often used in conversation to show attention and interest.


ええ yeah
ee

This is sometimes written as えー. This is a common substitute for はい with generally the same meaning. I’m listening and I’m interested. When said with a rising tone, it can show surpise or disbelief.


うん yep
un

This is a less formal but common way to say “yes.” As mentioned above, saying this doesn’t necessarily mean you agree with the speaker, but just that you are showing interest.


なるほど I see
naruhodo

When the listener explains something you didn’t previously understand, you can say, “I see” or “I get it” or “indeed.”


さすが As expected…
sasuga

This means “as one would expect” and is often used as a compliment. If the speaker says an accomplishment, compliment him or her with “I knew you could do it.”.


すごい! Amazing!
sugoi!

すごい means “amazing” and can be compared to the slang word “cool” or “awesome.” When the speaker says something amazing, use this.


そうですね。 That’s right.
sou desu ne.

Also shortened as そうだ, this literally means “That is so.” It shows mild agreement, but it could also just be used to show interest.


うそ  (surprise) No way!
uso

This literally means “lie.” When said with surprise, it means “Really?” but when said with disbelief, it can mean “I don’t believe that.”


うそ (disbelief) I don’t believe that.
uso

Depending on how you say this, it can show agreement (with shock) or disbelief (also with shock).


ほんと (I) swear; really; (I’m) telling the truth
honto

This can be used to agree with the listener. I swear. That’s for sure. I’m telling the truth. This literally means “true” or “fact.” In less colloquial circumstances, it really has a う at the end: ほんとう.


ほんとに really; truly
honto ni

The adverbial form can be used to confirm what someone said is really true.


まさか It can’t be…; no way; you don’t say
masaka

This is usually said when the listener suddenly realizes what the speaker is saying may actually be true despite it sounding absurd. It can’t be…


信じられない I don’t believe it

Literally, this means “I cannot believe.” but this can also be said when believing but not wanting to believe. I can’t believe (he did that).


ありえない impossible; no way
arienai!

This means impossible, but again, it may simply show the listener is shocked by what she hears.


おかしい That’s odd; funny; little strange
okashii

This means “odd” or “strange.” Something’s funny about that.


なんかへんな Something’s wrong with that; that’s odd
nanka henna

Literally, something strange.


 

Aizuchi Japanese Conversational Interjections

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Makoto e-Zine #8 November 2018 Audio Files

Makoto e-Zine #8 November 2018 Audio Files


Issue #8
November 2018

DOWNLOAD the eBOOK:

Please note: We are providing the sound files from this issue openly, but to follow along and have full access to grammatical notes and the running gloss, please either purchase this issue at:

LISTEN OR DOWNLOAD THE SOUND FILES:

Frank introduces Obaasan to his friend, Sushi. He learns Sushi is actually something to eat. Frank is saddened by this unexpected turn of events

Chapter Four: Sushi is Something to Eat – Click here to download – DOWNLOAD AUDIO

Japanese Reader: The Fountain of Youth 若返りの水 – SLOW – Click here to download – DOWNLOAD AUDIO

Japanese Reader: The Fountain of Youth 若返りの水 – NORMAL SPEED – Click here to download – DOWNLOAD AUDIO

 


IN THIS ISSUE:

NEW READER: Frank and the Obaasan & The Fountain of Youth
33 Pages

ž Laughs, Jokes, Riddles, and Puns
ž Prefecture Spotlight: Kumamoto
ž Etymology: Mizu ni Nagasou
ž Phrase of the Day: The Pen is Mightier than the Sword
ž Kanji Spotlight: JLPT N5 Kanji Numbers
ž Grammar Time! Plan To: yotei; tsumori
ž Frank and the Obaasan Reader, Grammatical Notes, Kanji Notes, and English Translation
ž The Fountain of Youth

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Japanese Vocabulary Lesson: How to Say I’m Sick in Japanese

Japanese Vocabulary Lesson: How to Say I’m Sick in Japanese

Feeling under the weather? Great! Uh, I mean, sorry you feel bad, but I have the perfect Japanese vocabulary lesson for you today. Here are five phrases you can use right now.

Japanese Vocabulary

Sick Japanese Vocabulary

のどがいたいです。
nodo ga itai desu.
I have a sore throat.
せきがでます。
seki ga demasu.
I have a cough.
頭がいたいです。
atama ga itai desu.
I have a headache. (lit. My head hurts.)
体がだるいです。
karada ga darui desu.
I feel under the weather.(lit. My body is languid.)
熱があります。
netsu ga arimasu.
I have a fever.

BTW, if you like the sumo shirt I’m wearing in the video, you can get it at Amazon here: (Ships US Only–sorry)
Or on TheJapanShop.com by clicking here. Ships world-wide! Yeah!
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5 Fun Anime Fighting Phrases in Japanese

5 Fun Anime Fighting Phrases in Japanese

5 Fun Anime Fighting Phrases in Japanese

Here are five kakkoii fighting phrases you might hear in anime Japanese or read in manga. Listen for them when you get to the fighting scenes.

Please note, all five of these can be rude–they are, after all, fighting words. Be careful how you use them, but saying them to your close Japanese friends could be fun.

Let’s get started with some Anime Fighting Phrases in Japanese

かかってこい!

Bring it on!

The かかって comes from a word that means “to start,” “to deal with,” “to handle.” こい is a somewhat rude command that means “come on!”


うけてたつ!

I accept your challenge!

When you are ready to take up the gauntlet, say, 「うけてたつ!」


まけるもんか!

I’ll never lose!

Said when things are not going well for the bad guy and he is about to lose. もん is an ender used for emphasis. もんか is used for creating rhetorical questions when the speaker actually believes the opposite is true. “Am I about to lose? No way!”


おぼえてろ!

I’ll get you for this!

The bad guy is lost and he knows it. He is in an embarrassing retreat, but to save face, he says to the victorious hero, 「おぼえてろ!」 Literally, this is “I’ll remember this.” It can mean, “You’ll be sorry!” or “You’ll regret this!” or “I’ll get even someday!”



ちくしょう!

Darn!

This is also pronounced ちきしょう. Literally, this means “livestock” or “beast.” When said when upset, however, it is a light curse. Dammit! Hang it all! Darn!


Anime fighting phrases
Download Audio files here:

kakattekoi
uketetatsu
makerumonka
oboetero
chikushou


Check out fun Japanese-themed shirts from
Amazon.com (if you are in the US)
TheJapanShop.com (if you are anywhere)

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