Makoto e-Zine #6 September 2018 Audio Files

Makoto e-Zine #6 September 2018 Audio Files


Issue #6
September 2018

DOWNLOAD the eBOOK:

Please note: We are providing the sound files from this issue openly, but to follow along and have full access to grammatical notes and the running gloss, please either purchase this issue at:

LISTEN OR DOWNLOAD THE SOUND FILES:

Takeda Shingen was a powerful daimyo of Kai Province (modern-day Yamanashi Prefecture). His primary rival was Uesugi Kenshin. Uesugi’s nickname was “The Dragon of Echigo” and Takeda’s nickname was “The Tiger of Kai.”. The story is recorded both regular speed and slowed down.

Reader Sound Files NORMAL SPEED: Click to Download

Reader Sound Files SLOW SPEED: Click to Download


IN THIS ISSUE:

NEW READER: Takeda Shingen
38 Pages

ž Laughs, Jokes, Riddles, and Puns
ž Prefecture Spotlight: Kagoshima
ž Etymology: あばよ
ž Phrase of the Day: Here’s looking at you, kid.
ž Kanji Spotlight: Behaviors
ž Grammar Time! しまう
ž Reader, Grammatical Notes, Kanji Notes, and English Translation

Makoto e-Zine #5 August 2018 Audio Files

Makoto e-Zine #5 August 2018 Audio Files


Issue #5
August 2018

DOWNLOAD the PDF:

Please note: We are providing the sound files from this issue openly, but to follow along and have full access to grammatical notes and the running gloss, please either purchase this issue at:

LISTEN OR DOWNLOAD THE SOUND FILES:

Listen to the story about ninja history and techniques. The story is recorded both regular speed and slowed down.

Reader Sound Files NORMAL SPEED: Click to Download

Reader Sound Files SLOW SPEED: Click to Download

 


IN THIS ISSUE:

NEW READER: 47 Ronin

ž Laughs, Jokes, Riddles, and Puns
ž Prefecture Spotlight: Okinawa
ž Etymology: おはよう
ž Phrase of the Day: English Proverbs in Japanese
ž Kanji Spotlight: The Bear Imposters
ž Grammar Time! To Decide Upon
ž Reader, Grammatical Notes, Kanji Notes, and English Translation

It’s a First! First Things in Japanese with the Kanji 初

It’s a First! First Things in Japanese with the Kanji 初

One advantage the student of kanji has is the ability to see broad patterns. Oftentimes, learning one kanji can quickly multiply to learning many vocabulary words.

Today, let’s look at a few–and there are many more–words that start with this kanji:

It is used for many words indicating a first. In most examples, 初 is pronounced “hatsu.”

初恋 【はつこい】 first love; puppy love
初孫 【はつまご】  first grandchild
初雪 【はつゆき】 first snow of the season
初耳 【はつみみ】 hearing something for the first time

Since New Year’s Day is huge in Japan, it’s no surprise many of these new words pertain to New Year’s Day.

初夢 【はつゆめ】 first dream of the year
初場所  【はつばしょ】New Year’s Sumo tournament held in Tokyo
初日の出 【はつひので】first sunrise of the year (New Year’s Day)

Another reading for this kanji is うい. I thought about putting this together while working on this month’s Makoto e-zine, which our Patreon supporters get automatically and at a discount each month. The reader for next month’s issue will cover the story of Takeda Shingen. In it, Yumi spoke of his 初陣,  first campaign.

Here are a few “first” words that begin with うい.

初陣 【ういじん】 first campaign; one’s first battle
初々しい 【ういういしい】 innocent; unsophisticated; fresh

かわいい x こわい Cute and Scary in Japanese

かわいい x こわい Cute and Scary in Japanese

Cute and Scary in Japanese Kawaii

TALE OF TWO WORDS
OR, how to say “cute” in Japanese without being scary…

かわいい cute; adorable; charming; pretty 【kanji: 可愛い | ASCII fun: カワ(・∀・)イイ!! 】

こわい scary; frightening; dreadful 【kanji: 怖い】

Listen carefully to the difference:

 

I (Clay) first arrived in Japan in the late 1990s. A friend of mine, another American, told me about a scary experience he had when confronted with a Japanese coworker’s newborn baby. My friend wanted to use the little Japanese he had learned and felt confident he could at least manage a “how cute” compliment. After his attempt, however, his coworker angrily said, “It’s KAWAII not KOWAI!”

Here’s the Ninja Penguin making the same mistake:

To the Japanese ear, these two words are very different, but to the English ear, there is often room for confusion. Try your best to hear the difference.

NOTE: Cute is かわいい. Pay attention to the “ka” sound and the longer “i” sound.


Another tricky one–at least for me–was 座る suwaru (to sit) and 触る sawaru (to touch). I can imagine quite a few instances where this would also result in a slap!


おまけ!EXTRA!

One more potentially confusing word pairing:

おしり oshiri–buttocks
押し入れ oshi ire–closet

Listen to these closely:

 

WARNING: Be careful with the following

あなたの押し入れはとても大きいですね。
anata no oshiire wa totemo ookii desu ne.
Your closet is very big!

Sounds nice enough when complimenting the lady of the house on her fine closet, but if said without care, it could easily come out as “Your butt is big. Very big.”

Free Japanese Fonts for Personal AND Commercial Use

Free Japanese Fonts for Personal AND Commercial Use

Totally free Japanese fonts for commercial use
If you are in need of free Japanese fonts, here are a few totally free fonts for personal AND commercial use. As I find more, I’ll post them here.
Note: if you have a PC, you may need a third-party software to open the gz compressed formats. 7-Zip is a common unzip program. 
A quick word on Japanese fonts. There are two main types of Japanese fonts. 
  • 明朝体 minchoutai — Ming style typeface
  • ゴシック体  goshikkutai — Gothic style typeface
The 明朝体 or “Ming Dynasty font” is so named because it mimics the regular script style developed during the Ming Dynasty. This is the most commonly used style of font in Japan.
The ゴシック体 or Gothic style is kind of like the English Courier font or a plain sans serif style in that the strokes have an even thickness and a lack serifs or decorative strokes at the end of a line.
Makoto e-Zine #1 Audio Files

Makoto e-Zine #1 Audio Files

Makoto Japanese instructional e-zine


Issue #1
April 2018

PLEASE NOTE: We are pleased to announce we have launched our Patreon subscription for Makoto! Grab #1 here for free and if you like what you see, click here to view our Patreon deals. Not only can you get Makoto at a discount, but you will also get exclusive and near daily content, coupons, and eBooks with MP3s. Click here now.

DOWNLOAD the eBOOK:

Please note: This issue is completely free and may be downloaded as a PDF (recommended for the pretty graphics), MOBI (for Kindles and Kindle readers), or ePub (eBook format for everyone else). Click here to download the e-zine.

LISTEN OR DOWNLOAD THE SOUND FILES:

Listen to the story about three mighty warrior leaders who consolidated Japan and ended the Warring States period. The story is recorded both regular speed and slowed down.

 

Reader Sound Files SLOW SPEED: Click to Download

Reader Sound Files NORMAL SPEED: Click to Download


IN THIS ISSUE:

20+ ways to say I, ME, & THEE
NEW READER:The Warrior Leaders of the Sengoku Period

ž Laughs, Jokes, Riddles, and Puns
ž Prefecture Spotlight: FUKUI
ž Etymology: 折り紙付き
ž Phrase of the Day: Murphy’s Law
ž Ukiyo-e: Sharaku
ž Kanji Spotlight: 集
ž Grammar Time! ~ほうがいい

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