Beginner Japanese Sentences: Asking Questions

Beginner Japanese Sentences: Asking Questions

Building upon the first podcast, this episode covers adding a か ka at the end to change a statement into a question.

何か食べたいです。 I want something to eat. – nanika tabetai desu.

[Note: the ‘I’ is assumed, but it just as easily be ‘you’ in the right context.]

To make that into a question, just add か

[Notice I didn’t say ‘Would I like something to eat?’ since it is obvious ‘you’ would be more appropriate]

何か飲みたいです。 I want something to drink. – nanika nomitai desu.

何か飲みたいですか? Would you like something to drink – nanika nomitai desu ka?

Pimsleur Language Programs


 

Countries and Language Names in Japanese

Countries and Language Names in Japanese

In English we say “Japanese” and “Spanish,” but not “Germanese” or “Americanish.” In Japanese, saying language names is, in some ways, easier. Just add a 語 go after the country mainly associated with the language.

Regular Examples

日本 nihon Japan
日本語 nihongo Japanese

スペイン supein Spain
スペイン語 supeingo Spainish

フランス furansu France
フランス語 furansugo French

ドイツ doitsu Germany
ドイツ語 doitsugo German (language)

ロシア roshia Russia
ロシア語 roshiago Russian (language)

イタリア itaria Italy
イタリア語 itariago Italian

韓国 kankoku (South) Korea
韓国語 kankokugo Korean

中国 chuugoku China
中国語 chuugokugo Chinese (language)

 

Irregular Examples

イギリス igirisu England
アメリカ amerika America
オーストラリア o-sutoraria Australia
ニュージーランド nyu- ji-rando New Zealand
etc.
英語 eigo English

イスラエル israeru Israel
ヘブライ語 heburaigo Hebrew
or ヘブル語 heburugo Hebrew

インド indo India
ヒンディー語 hindi- Hindi

Language Names in Japanese Chart
This, of course, is not a full list. Feel free to add other countries in the comments below.

 

I Want to… I Really Do, But How Do I Say I Want to in Japanese?

I Want to… I Really Do, But How Do I Say I Want to in Japanese?

Basic Japanese grammar lesson: Using ~たい ~tai–to want to…

  • Adding ~tai adds the “want to” meaning.
  • This is formed by finding the ~masu form and adding ~tai.
  • For example:
    To eat → to want to eat:
    食べる → 食べます → 食べ+たい → 食べたい
    taberu → tabemasu → tabe+tai  →  tabetai
    To Drink → to want to drink:
    飲む → 飲みます → 飲み+たい → 飲みたい
    nomu → nomimasu → nomi+tai  → nomitai

なにか飲みたいです。

nanika nomitai desu.
I want to drink something.

なにか nanika–something
飲みたい nomitai–want to drink [This is formed with the ~masu form of 飲む nomu–to drink + たい tai–(want to…)] です desu–copula (usually like to be)

Next, let’s turn this into a question.

Notice in the above example, we didn’t use a pronoun. The “I” was understood. In this next example, we still won’t use a pronoun, but by adding the question marker か ka, the “you” is implied.

なにか食べたいですか。

nanika tabetai desu ka.
Do you want to eat something?

なにか nanika–something
食べたい tabetai–want to eat [This is formed with the ~masu form of 食べる taberu–to eat + たい tai–(want to…)] です desu–copula (usually like to be)

Pimsleur Language Programs


 

Makoto e-Zine #8 November 2018 Audio Files

Makoto e-Zine #8 November 2018 Audio Files


Issue #8
November 2018

DOWNLOAD the eBOOK:

Please note: We are providing the sound files from this issue openly, but to follow along and have full access to grammatical notes and the running gloss, please either purchase this issue at:

LISTEN OR DOWNLOAD THE SOUND FILES:

Frank introduces Obaasan to his friend, Sushi. He learns Sushi is actually something to eat. Frank is saddened by this unexpected turn of events

Chapter Four: Sushi is Something to Eat – Click here to download – DOWNLOAD AUDIO

Japanese Reader: The Fountain of Youth 若返りの水 – SLOW – Click here to download – DOWNLOAD AUDIO

Japanese Reader: The Fountain of Youth 若返りの水 – NORMAL SPEED – Click here to download – DOWNLOAD AUDIO

 


IN THIS ISSUE:

NEW READER: Frank and the Obaasan & The Fountain of Youth
33 Pages

ž Laughs, Jokes, Riddles, and Puns
ž Prefecture Spotlight: Kumamoto
ž Etymology: Mizu ni Nagasou
ž Phrase of the Day: The Pen is Mightier than the Sword
ž Kanji Spotlight: JLPT N5 Kanji Numbers
ž Grammar Time! Plan To: yotei; tsumori
ž Frank and the Obaasan Reader, Grammatical Notes, Kanji Notes, and English Translation
ž The Fountain of Youth

Japanese Vocabulary Lesson: How to Say I’m Sick in Japanese

Japanese Vocabulary Lesson: How to Say I’m Sick in Japanese

Feeling under the weather? Great! Uh, I mean, sorry you feel bad, but I have the perfect Japanese vocabulary lesson for you today. Here are five phrases you can use right now.

Japanese Vocabulary

Sick Japanese Vocabulary

のどがいたいです。
nodo ga itai desu.
I have a sore throat.
せきがでます。
seki ga demasu.
I have a cough.
頭がいたいです。
atama ga itai desu.
I have a headache. (lit. My head hurts.)
体がだるいです。
karada ga darui desu.
I feel under the weather.(lit. My body is languid.)
熱があります。
netsu ga arimasu.
I have a fever.

BTW, if you like the sumo shirt I’m wearing in the video, you can get it at Amazon here: (Ships US Only–sorry)
Or on TheJapanShop.com by clicking here. Ships world-wide! Yeah!
5 Fun Anime Fighting Phrases in Japanese

5 Fun Anime Fighting Phrases in Japanese

5 Fun Anime Fighting Phrases in Japanese

Here are five kakkoii fighting phrases you might hear in anime Japanese or read in manga. Listen for them when you get to the fighting scenes.

Please note, all five of these can be rude–they are, after all, fighting words. Be careful how you use them, but saying them to your close Japanese friends could be fun.

Let’s get started with some Anime Fighting Phrases in Japanese

かかってこい!

Bring it on!

The かかって comes from a word that means “to start,” “to deal with,” “to handle.” こい is a somewhat rude command that means “come on!”


うけてたつ!

I accept your challenge!

When you are ready to take up the gauntlet, say, 「うけてたつ!」


まけるもんか!

I’ll never lose!

Said when things are not going well for the bad guy and he is about to lose. もん is an ender used for emphasis. もんか is used for creating rhetorical questions when the speaker actually believes the opposite is true. “Am I about to lose? No way!”


おぼえてろ!

I’ll get you for this!

The bad guy is lost and he knows it. He is in an embarrassing retreat, but to save face, he says to the victorious hero, 「おぼえてろ!」 Literally, this is “I’ll remember this.” It can mean, “You’ll be sorry!” or “You’ll regret this!” or “I’ll get even someday!”



ちくしょう!

Darn!

This is also pronounced ちきしょう. Literally, this means “livestock” or “beast.” When said when upset, however, it is a light curse. Dammit! Hang it all! Darn!


Anime fighting phrases
Download Audio files here:

kakattekoi
uketetatsu
makerumonka
oboetero
chikushou


Check out fun Japanese-themed shirts from
Amazon.com (if you are in the US)
TheJapanShop.com (if you are anywhere)